The Psychology Of Innovation: From Purpose To Gratitude

7 April, 2016 / Articles
innovation-a1a3a2081150598f11ab5c64fe689e7c

Successful entrepreneurs tend to have a lot in common. In fact, some of the most successful entrepreneurs of all time — from Walt Disney to Steve Jobs — started with simple solutions to complex problems and ended up building several of the most important and impactful companies of all time.

In the case of Walt Disney, he simply set out to make people happy. Indeed, Walt did just that by creating the happiest place on Earth (Disneyland) with iconic characters like Snow White and Mickey Mouse. Steve Jobs, on the other hand, revolutionized the computer industry by making computers and Internet more accessible for the purposes of greater productivity and entertainment.

Disney and Jobs have a lot in common with tens of thousands of successful entrepreneurs from around the world who have succeeded in business. Most recently I highlighted these “commonalities” in a keynote presentation entitled “Psychology of Innovation,” which I delivered at the 2015 Annual Disney Interactive Global Summit.

The psychology of innovation traces the most common psychological characteristics that make up innovative people and their organizations. By familiarizing yourself with these psychological characteristics, you can vastly improve not only your business and workplace culture, but also yourself as a business owner.

Have Purpose and Simplify

In his best-selling book Start with Why, Simon Sinek suggests that purpose is a statement of why people should care about what an organization does. He suggests that people don’t buy what an organization does, but rather why a company does it.

Walt Disney’s main purpose for Disneyland was to bring happiness to humanity. That purpose is fulfilled by hundreds of thousands of visitors yearly, and has enabled it to become one of the most prominent businesses in the world.

The scientist and innovator, Fernando Fischmann, founder of Crystal Lagoons, recommends this article.

SOURCE

FacebookTwitterGoogle+LinkedInCompartir

Te puede interesar